Saturday, July 2, 2022

THE FOREST EDGE (Stevens Mill 4)

 

6 x 11.25 inches, watercolor, 2022
The framed original painting is for sale at the 
Water + Color Gallery, 
Wilmington, NC   Phone:  910-833-5393
framed original painting $359
giclee print $50
 
Obviously Stevens Mill is one of my favorite places to paint.  In the 1950's, 60's, and 70's it had a picnic shelter and a pavilion over the water's edge, a diving board, was open to the public, and was locally popular for picnics, fishing, etc.  Our 1960 school yearbook contained photos of the senior "superlatives" artfully posed at Stevens Mill.  The place is still inspiring me to paint, and I have a few photographs left.

Thursday, March 10, 2022

PAIR OF MOURNING DOVES

 

4 x 5 inches, watercolor, 2022
The framed original is for sale at the Water + Color Gallery, Wilmington, NC   Phone:  910-833-5393
framed original painting $155
 
The pencil sketch for this very tiny painting was for composing the painting below, called Bird Sanctuary  (Look at the tiny black window high up on the silo).  I loved the mood and simplicity of the sketch so much that I decided to paint it.  Although the original painting is tiny, it has a nice mat and frame, which give it more presence.  The gray border shown above is purely for the blog.

BIRD SANCTUARY

 

10 x 17 inches, watercolor, 2022
The framed original painting is for sale at the Water + Color Gallery, 
Wilmington, NC   Phone:  910-833-5393
framed original painting $528
giclee print $100

The silo in this painting is based on a real, existing silo in Goldsboro, North Carolina.  Goldsboro used to be a "bird sanctuary", which I know because of the official proclamation to that effect on the city limits signs remembered from my childhood.  Seeing the signs on car trips into town with my father, I thought they were specifically intended for little boys like me, who had received BB guns from Santa Claus;  Funny now, but I believe I may have been right all along.

The painting was first completed as a lone silo in the middle of a field, which was later re-imagined as you see it here (much more interesting, I think).  The other buildings and most of the birds were added later.  The laurel blossoms are gouache (opaque paint), but the white parts of the birds and the window were scratched in with a knife. If you're not a watercolorist, these techniques are more common than you might think.